Feeds
75%
TomTom Start 20

TomTom Start 20 satnav

Travelling light

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Review TomTom’s entry level Start satnavs have long been the default choice for anyone wanting a reliable but basic PND. Now the range has been given a wash and brush up with the release of some new 4.3in screen devices with prices starting at £130.

TomTom Start 20

Baby driver: TomTom's Start 20

The design of the Start 20 addresses a couple of long-standing bug bears with many PND users, namely windscreen clutter and suction ring marks. The new integrated ball-and-socket mounting will let you stick the device either the usual way up or upside down, with the screen flipping through 180 degrees depending on orientation.

The advantage of this is that you can mount the unit on your dashboard as well as your windscreen. Ideally, to use it on the dash you need to cough up £5 for a pack of two self-adhesive mounting rings but as long as there is a convenient flat surface, you don’t actually need them.

It’s an impressively flexible design that can be set to just about any angle you care to conceive of. Once you’ve become used to it being mounted on the dash, you won’t ever want to go back to sticking it to the windscreen. The integrated holder is also a compact affair – fold it flat against the unit and it only adds another 15mm making the whole rig extremely easy to slip into a bag or pocket.

TomTom Start 20

Stick to the road

The Start 20 is the first satnav I have come across to use a micro rather than mini USB socket for charging and the bundled 12V plug connects with a standard USB port. Not earth-shattering developments, I grant you, but life is easier when your PND and smartphone can share cables.

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Next page: Promising Start?

More from The Register

next story
Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies
Gummy pterosaurs outlived toothy competitors
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
'Leccy racer whacks petrols in Oz race
ELMOFO rakes in two wins in sanctioned race
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.