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Hacker wrists slapped for stealing Lady Gaga songs

Trojan attack nets racy Kesha photos

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Two German hackers have been convicted of stealing unpublished songs from some of the most popular recording stars, including Lady Gaga, Mariah Carey and Justin Timberlake, and selling them for a tidy profit.

The unidentified youths, aged 18 and 23, used phishing attacks and trojans to plant malware on the computers of the artists' managers and then pilfering the new material, AFP reported. They turned a profit of about 15,000 euros by offering them for sale online.

The 18-year-old hacker, who called himself DJ Stolen, also downloaded explicit private photos from bombshell artist Kesha and blackmailed her to give him an audio endorsement that he could use to promote his image among hackers, AFP said.

DJ Stolen received an 18-month sentence at a young offender's institute, and the older defendant got an 18-month suspended sentence.

The judge in the case “considered the fact that both defendants are attested to be highly addicted to the internet to be a mitigating factor,” a spokesman for the local court in the western city of Duisburg told the AFP. ®

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