Feeds

Turkey arrests Anonymous suspects after DDoS protest

Ataboy

High performance access to file storage

Turkish police have arrested 32 suspected members of Anonymous, the loosely knit cracktivist collective, following hack attacks against government websites.

Anonymous supporters in Turkey vented their frustration against proposed net filtering legislation by running a series of denial of service attacks against government websites last week. The sites targeted included Turkey’s Telecommunications Communication Presidency (http://tib.gov.tr) and Ministry of Labour (www.­sgk.­gov.­tr).

It appears that the activists made the mistake of using tools, such as Anonymous' Low Orbit Ion Cannon, that fail to cloak the identity of computers participating in denial of service attacks.

However they did it, Turkish authorities were quick to identify potential suspects, before launching a series of raids that resulted in the arrest of 32 suspects in 12 cities, according to Turkish news agency Anadolu.

Turkey has a history of net censorship, including incidents where it mandated local ISPs to block YouTube, sometimes for months at a time, over clips taken as insulting the country's founder Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. Activists fear Turkey's net filtering systems, due to come online in August, could become a tool for logging surfing habits and stifling free speech.

The arrests in Turkey follow last week's arrest of three Spanish residents accused of hacking the Sony PlayStation store and the Spanish Electoral Commission website. These assaults were also motivated by proposed laws geared towards clamping down on illegal filesharing.

Unsurprisingly the Spanish arrests have incurred the ire of parts of Anonymous, who responding by launching a fresh wave of attacks targeting the web presence of Spain's national police. The site - www.policia.es - was knocked offline for about an hour on Saturday as a result, the BBC reports. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Big Content goes after Kim Dotcom
Six studios sling sueballs at dead download destination
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data
Prime minister: Nothing to see here, go about your business
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.