Feeds

BP world energy review: Chinese coal drives up CO2

EU's emissions cuts paltry in comparison

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Last year saw the highest surge in energy demand for almost 40 years, according to BP's 60th annual review* of energy. Despite record renewable energy production – with hydroelectric energy use rising 6.5 per cent – fossil fuel consumption surged to the highest level ever.

Gas was up 7.4 per cent and coal, which still accounts for 30 per cent of all energy consumption, was up 7.6 per cent. The boost in hydro was thanks to China's vast new dams coming online; the country produces 60 per cent of the world's hydroelectric energy.

China has doubled its energy use in a decade, and became the largest energy user in the world, with 20.3 per cent. Almost half of China's energy comes from coal.

So not surprisingly, CO2 emissions reached record levels in 2010, growing 5.8 per cent to 33.16 billion tonnes, to which China contributed 8.33 billion tonnes. BP's figure is slightly higher than last month's estimate from the International Energy Agency (IEA), which estimates CO2 at 30 billion tonnes.

Last month the European Environment Agency said that emissions of 15 EU members who had signed up to the Kyoto Protocol had fallen by 6.9 per cent in 2009. But it doesn't make a blind bit of difference, when faced with the gigantic industrialisation of China and India.

China is also the largest producer of cement, which contributes around 5 per cent of anthropogenic CO2 emission, because of calcination. Cement production also uses a lot of coal-produced energy in China.

The BP survey notes that shale gas now contributes to 23 per cent of all US gas production, making the country gas self-sufficient. Because shale gas produces lower CO2 emissions than coal, and coal is the leading power-generation source in the new economic powerhouses, the best hope of lowering global CO2 may be to persuade China and other giants to drop coal for gas. Renewable energy accounted for a tiddling 1.8 per cent of global consumption: the figure includes biofuels, wind, solar and hydro.

The survey can be found here, in a (45-page/7.5MB, PDF) nutshell. A shorter summary is here. ®

*The survey was first published in 1951 by the Anglo Iranian Oil Company – before it changed its name to BP.

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away
Interplanetary admins will back up data and get to work
SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk
No injuries or near injuries. Flight stayed in designated area
Galileo, Galileo! Galileo, Galileo! Galileo fit to go. Magnifico
I'm just a poor boy, nobody loves me. But at least I can find my way with ESA GPS by 2017
EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz
WA facility gets laser-eyes out of the fog
LOHAN Kickstarter push breaks TWELVE THOUSAND POUNDS
That's right, folks, you've stumped up OVER 9,000 beer tokens - and counting
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?