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Nintendo outs eShop update for 3DS

Weekly content promised

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Nintendo has launched the eShop for 3DS, offering 3D versions of games from yesteryear, as well as movie trailers and details of upcoming releases.

The eShop feature was originally planned for a release in May, but was pushed back to coincide with the company's press conference at E3 tomorrow.

According to Nintendo UK's website, 3DS gamers will be offered new content on a weekly basis. The update will also include access to the 3DS browser, all geared up for 3D web content.

Those that download the update in the first day will be given a free copy of NES classic Excitebike too.

The eShop feature should help elevate interest in the handheld, which despite an extensive hype campaign, has struggled to tickle fancy. Recently, Nintendo blamed a confused public for the reason sales fell short of initial expectations.

Nintendo 3DS

Shell out some more

Big revelations are expected in the Ninty camp tomorrow, with the announcement of the next Wii console, a device developers are already drooling over. We'll keep you posted. ®

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