Feeds

HTC exposes customers' privates

Maybe someone else will ship them a phone?

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

HTC might be very slowly improving the quality of its repair service, but for the last week it has also been revealing customer details with a flick of a URL.

The URL concerned is emailed out by an HTC subcontractor to customers waiting for the return of their handsets. It links to details of their repair as identified by a job number at the end of the URL. But change the job number and you get to see someone else's details – or at least you did until the chaps over at Mobiles Please told them about it.

It's not a huge flaw: just the customer's name and address, along with the IMEI and serial number of the handset. However, it is indicative of a process which has been rushed by HTC and Regenersis – which actually does the work – as the company attempts to improve its repair and servicing processes.

Since we reported just how bad things were at HTC we've had some mails from reasonably satisfied customers. Free accessories have mollified some, while others are just happy to have their handsets back, but a significant number are still waiting to see when (and if) they'll see their phones again.

We don't know when Regenersis started handling repairs for HTC in the UK, but the company already provides warranty repairs for HTC (and Apple) in Poland, and fixes kit for UK shoppers buying from John Lewis and Argos as well as supporting Tetra radios for EDS.

Such an experienced company shouldn't make mistakes like this. Web developers often think security is something which can be added later, but Regenersis should know better, and revealing customer details isn't going to make any of those customers happier. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.