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HTC exposes customers' privates

Maybe someone else will ship them a phone?

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HTC might be very slowly improving the quality of its repair service, but for the last week it has also been revealing customer details with a flick of a URL.

The URL concerned is emailed out by an HTC subcontractor to customers waiting for the return of their handsets. It links to details of their repair as identified by a job number at the end of the URL. But change the job number and you get to see someone else's details – or at least you did until the chaps over at Mobiles Please told them about it.

It's not a huge flaw: just the customer's name and address, along with the IMEI and serial number of the handset. However, it is indicative of a process which has been rushed by HTC and Regenersis – which actually does the work – as the company attempts to improve its repair and servicing processes.

Since we reported just how bad things were at HTC we've had some mails from reasonably satisfied customers. Free accessories have mollified some, while others are just happy to have their handsets back, but a significant number are still waiting to see when (and if) they'll see their phones again.

We don't know when Regenersis started handling repairs for HTC in the UK, but the company already provides warranty repairs for HTC (and Apple) in Poland, and fixes kit for UK shoppers buying from John Lewis and Argos as well as supporting Tetra radios for EDS.

Such an experienced company shouldn't make mistakes like this. Web developers often think security is something which can be added later, but Regenersis should know better, and revealing customer details isn't going to make any of those customers happier. ®

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