Feeds

Apple to open iCloud for 'free' before slapping $25 subs on service

Wrapped in ads, too

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Apple is reportedly planning to shepherd its existing iTunes subscribers into the company's upcoming iCloud service, by initially offering them to make the online pilgrimage at nada cost.

Down the line, however, the LA Times reports that users will be slapped with an annual subscription fee – said to be around $25 – to access the service.

The iCloud music storage system is also expected to be wrapped in advertising, to help Apple fluff up its revenue stream online.

Cupertino will reveal more about the service at the firm's annual Worldwide Developers Conference on Monday, 6 June, at which Apple boss Steve Jobs – who is currently on medical leave – will be present to "kick off" proceedings.

If the LA Times, which cites sources familiar with the negotiations, is accurate then the iCloud service will be a significant departure from Apple's iTunes subs model, given that ads will be slotted in.

The newspaper said that Apple has now completed the inking of contracts with the Big Four record labels, having finalised a deal with Universal this week.

Warner Music Group, EMI Group and Sony Music Entertainment have all reportedly signed agreements with Apple in recent weeks, to allow Apple to stream and sell their content online.

Apple will apparently share 70 per cent of any revenue from its iCloud music service with the record companies. Meanwhile, music publishers will get a 12 per cent cut and the remaining 18 per cent will be pocketed by Apple, according to the LA Times report.

Meanwhile, the final elements of Apple's cloud service are coming into view ahead of Monday's Big Reveal.

The company has now officially taken control of the icloud.com domain, according to Whois records. It's understood Apple paid $4.5m to Sweden-based Xcerion, which previously owned the domain.

As we reported last month, a new application for the iCloud trademark was made by Douglas Dane Baker of North Carolina, who submitted the request to the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) on 6 May 2011.

Then, on 31 May, when Apple confirmed the existence of its iCloud service, the European trademark office published Cupertino's filing for the mark. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.