Feeds

Google rolls its Facebook mimic onto rest of web

Zuckerberg envy extended

New hybrid storage solutions

Google has rolled its Facebook-mimicking "+1" button onto third-party websites.

Mountain View debuted the button on its own search engine this past March, describing it as a way for Google users to recommend search results to other users. The button appeared beside weblinks as well as ads, and if you clicked on it, Google would then display a "+1" icon on the same link when people you're connected to – via Google Chat, Google Contacts, or other services – ran searches of their own.

"It’s called +1 – the digital shorthand for 'this is pretty cool,'" the company said. The shorthand was previously popularized by Slashdot.org and other sites.

Now, third-parties can add the Google +1 button to their own sites. "But sometimes you want to +1 a page while you’re on it. After all, how do you know you want to suggest that recipe for chocolate flan if you haven’t tried it out yet?" the company said in a Wednesday blog post. "Today, we’re releasing +1 buttons to the whole web. As a result, you might start seeing +1 appear on sites large and small across the Internet."

The button is already offered by Reuters, TechCrunch, Mashable, Bloomberg, O'Reilly, The Washington Post, and other Google partners. Google also said it's rolling the button onto other properties of its own, including the Android Market, Blogger, Product Search, and YouTube.

The +1 button is analogous to the Facebook "Like" button, which has long been used by third-party sites. Google's button is designed to better target ads as well as "organic" search results to particular users, and if it's used on third-party sites, Google can potentially have even more insight into what you enjoy on the web.

The motivation is simple: If you tell Google what you like, Google has a better idea of what ads you might click on. "Our goal at Google is to get you the most relevant results as quickly as possible. But relevance is about relationships as well as words on webpages," Google has said.

Facebook has a particular knack for collecting such user data, and since Zuckerberg and company have been reluctant to share this data with Google and others, Google has tried time and again to establish a reliable way of gathering the information on its own. Before +1, there was Orkut and Google Buzz. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.