Feeds

Utilities turn in blacklisted carbon emission credits

More fallout from high profile cyber-heists that shut registries across Europe

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More prominent power generation outfits have surrendered stolen carbon emission permits after realising that they had inadvertently purchased illicit goods.

German utility Eon and Frankfurt-based infrastructure provider Infraserv turned in a collective total of 27,100 blacklisted EUAs (EU Emission Allowances). The certificates were among 186,500 EUAs and 46,000 certified emissions reductions (CERs) fraudulently obtained from German paper manufacturer Drewsen Spezialpapiere via a high-profile phishing scam late last year.

"Eon Energy Trading acquired and surrendered the EUAs in question in good faith," an Eon spokesman told Thomson Reuters Point Carbon (story - subscription required).

The phishing scams and other security problems led to the closure of carbon trading exchanges across Europe in January. Cybercrooks stole permits worth an estimated €30m ($41 million) in allowances in a string of attacks. Roughly 2.78 million of the estimated 3.3 million blacklisted EUAs remain in circulation.

Energy giants ScottishPower and RWE were among five firms identified earlier this week as the unwitting recipients of stolen emission permits. The stolen allowance came from scam involving thefts from accounts maintained from carbon registries in Italy, Romania and the Czech Republic.

There is no suggestion any of the seven firms did anything wrong. It seems that corrupt intermediaries bought permits from phishing fraudsters before fencing these permits to unwitting sellers. Although they can't be traded, the blacklisted EUAs remain eligible for compliance use, Thomson Reuters Point Carbon adds.

Carbon-trading registries represent an attempt to apply a market-based solution towards limiting carbon emissions. Polluters are able to buy and sell emission credits as part of a cap-and-trade system designed so that cleaner factories and energy generation facilities pay less.

Both free market economists and green activists hate the system, albeit for different reasons. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.