Feeds

SeeSaw video-on-demand service to close

Arqiva fails to find a buyer, internal email reveals

Security for virtualized datacentres

Arqiva is closing down its online video-on-demand service, SeeSaw.

SeeSaw, which was effectively put up for sale in January, will shut up shop at the end of June.

In an email sent to Arqiva staff today - and seen by Reg Hardware - company CEO John Cresswell said: "Despite varying levels of interest being shown [in SeeSaw], we have not received any firm commitment from any party."

SeeSaw was launched in February 2010, formed from the bones of Project Kangaroo, an ill-fated VoD platform development programme established in 2007 by the BBC, ITV and Channel 4 but knocked on the head in July 2009 by the Competition Commission.

Arqiva, which owns and runs the UK's terrestrial broadcasting infrastructure, bought Kangaroo's assets and spent six months turning them into a workable VoD service - SeeSaw.

It offers a range of BBC, ITV, C4, Five, MTV and Universal content, some for free, some at a premium using a rental model. Much of the free content is paid for by advertising, though SeeSaw will let you watch it without breaks if you pay £3 a month.

SeeSaw closure notice

SeeSaw might have survived had YouView appeared by now. The would-be standard VoD platform, which is backed by Arqiva, was due to debut this year, but now won't be out - in boxes you can buy - until 2012.

YouView would have got SeeSaw onto TVs, not just the web, and thus to a potentially much larger audience. However, since many of SeeSaw's content providers are also YouView backers, YouView might have made SeeSaw redundant.

Possibly that's why Arqiva wanted rid of SeeSaw, but couldn't find, as Cresswell put it, "an investment partner or buyer who could help to take SeeSaw to the next stage in its growth and development".

He added: "We will continue to exhaust all possible avenues to find a buyer during the next month but, as a first step in closing the service, we have this week begun a formal consultation process by first discussing our proposal for closure with BECTU and the Group Employee Forum Broadcast and Media representatives and following this with briefing the SeeSaw team."

Technicolor dropped out of the YouView supporters club earlier this month. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate
Belay that toil, me hearty, and park your scurvy backside
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Lumia rebrand begins: Nokia's new UK web home is Microsoft.com
Yarr, them Nokia logos walking the plank and into the drink
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.