Feeds

Cabinet Office shakes up PSN

New governance arrangements for Public Sector Network

Mobile application security vulnerability report

The Cabinet Office has created a new governance regime for the Public Sector Network (PSN) as the next step in its development.

Work on various elements of the PSN, which is being developed as a 'network of networks' from existing commercial infrastructure to promote collaborative working, will be distributed among the major Whitehall departments.

The Cabinet Office has told suppliers involved in the programme that it will retain responsibility for procurement, ICT capability, re-use and innovation, but that six other departments will now take more prominent roles. Their responsibilities will be as follows:

- Department of Health – information strategies and data standards.

- HM Revenue and Customs – desktop and devices strategy, reference architecture and technical standards.

- Ministry of Defence (MoD) – networks, security and green issues.

- Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) – channels, citizen engagement and agile development.

- Home Office – open source, social media and document standards.

- Ministry of Justice – data centre consolidation, cloud and the applications store.

In addition, John Taylor, chief information officer of the MoD, has been made senior responsible owner for the programme, and will chair the steering board. A programme board, chaired by DWP ICT director Kenny Robertson, will oversee the details of the PSN's development, with programme director John Stubley leading the work.

The move comes at a time when the government wants to accelerate the rollout of the PSN. In recent months it has signed deeds of undertaking with four companies - Global Crossing, Cable & Wireless, BT and Virgin Media - to provide services for the Government Conveyance Network (GCN), which interconnects PSN network service providers.

Jeff Parris, senior vice president business development at Global Crossing, commented that the next step would involve local authorities taking a more active role in the programme. It will have representation on the steering board, and individual authorities could be influential in determining the services to be offered.

"Local government often leads in new developments because of the size of its service range," he said. "If they can get local government very much engaged in the process, recognising it does not always speak with one voice, it will be very positive."

He suggested that, while the large systems integrators retain a strong influence on how central government uses IT, they have less interest in local government due to its fragmented nature and the limited size of most councils. This leaves more scope for other service providers to work directly with local authorities.

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
US Social Security 'wasted $300 million on an IT BOONDOGGLE'
Scrutiny committee bods probe derailed database project
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Australia floats website blocks and ISP liability to stop copyright thieves
Big Content could get the right to order ISPs to stop traffic
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.