Feeds

Super Micro whiteboxes Ethernet switches

Well, they're grey boxes, actually

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

If you're willing to go to whitebox server maker Super Micro for your motherboards and complete systems, then you're probably willing to consider going all the way and get your network adapters and switches from the company as well. That seems to be the thinking at Super Micro, as the company punts three Ethernet switches.

More and more service providers and hyperscale data center operators are looking at whitebox vendors like Super Micro for servers because they can get a lot more bang for their buck, so why not networking if vendors are all using the same basic silicon for switching?

The first switch from Super Micro is the SSE-X24S, which is a top-of-racker that crams 24 non-blocking SFP+ 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports into a 1U chassis. The machine is a Layer 2 and 3 switch that delivers 480Gb/sec of non-blocking switching capacity and supports 4,000 VLANs; it has redundant firmware for high availability and has two hot-swappable 300 watt power supplies. It has a suggested retail price of $8,920, or a mere $372 per port.

The SSE-X24SR is a version of the machine that has reverse airflow so you can mount it in the back of the server rack and not suck in air from the hot data center aisle, shortening the life of the switch.

Super Micro Ethernet switches

Super Micro's Ethernet switch lineup

The SSE-G24-TG4 is Super Micro's 24-port aggregation switch, which has 24 Gigabit Ethernet ports with four 10GE ports to link to servers with 10GE ports or to be used as uplinks to network backbones. This switch, also packed into a 1U box, has 136Gb/sec of switching capacity and support up to 1,024 VLANs.

Each switch can have two stacking ports, and up to eight can be daisy-chained together to present a single logical switch image to network administrators. It has a suggested retail price of $1,467, or $61 per Gigabit Ethernet port.

And finally, the SSE-G48-TG4 is a 48-port Gigabit Ethernet switch with four 10GE uplinks that has 184Gb/sec of switching bandwidth and supports 1,024 VLANs. This switch, also a 1U unit, can be stacked eight units high, just like the 24-port switch above. The SSE-G48-TG4 costs $2,433, or $51 per Gigabit Ethernet port.

Super Micro and its reseller channel partners discount off these prices - just like all network equipment providers do. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
DEATH by COMMENTS: WordPress XSS vuln is BIGGEST for YEARS
Trio of XSS turns attackers into admins
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
How to simplify SSL certificate management
Simple steps to take control of SSL certificates across the enterprise, and recommendations centralizing certificate management throughout their lifecycle.