Feeds

Falun Gong lawsuit skewers Cisco's 'little red' sales book

Cisco denies teaching Beijing 'to track subversives'

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Cisco used Maoist rhetoric to pitch its networking kit to the Chinese government and customised it to help Beijing crack down on the Falun Gong movement, a lawsuit claims.

Falun Gong supporters in the US filed the suit in California last week, the New York Times reports.

The suit claims that Cisco helped design China's Great Firewall, which helps the Beijing government keep a lid and track dissenters such as Falun Gong, troublesome artists and people who insist on running internet searches on Tiananmen Square.

Cisco boss John Chambers is named in the suit along with other execs, the suit says.

According to the NYT, sales materials compiled for the Chinese government referred to the "douzheng evil Falun Gong cult and other hostile elements". Douzheng was a term used during the Cultural Revolution to describe undesirable groups.

Other Cisco docs made suggestions as to how technology could be used to track subversive elements, the suit claims.

The suit has been brought by the Human Rights Law Foundation, on behalf of three named Falun Gong members and eight other unidentified members, some of whom have been allegedy tortured or killed.

Cisco condemned the suit, telling the NYT: "Cisco does not operate networks in China or elsewhere, nor does Cisco customize our products in any way that would facilitate censorship or repression.”

Given the expertise of Chinese datacoms manufacturer Huawei in Cisco gear, it hardly seems necessary for Beijing to have asked for Cisco's help to tweak its kit.

Falun Gong is a movement that loosely speaking grew out of Qijong, but which has a slightly more moral temper. To Western eyes it might appear to be an even more static version of Tai Chi, but Beijing apparently places it somewhere between market capitalism and satanism as a threat to the state and has set out to eradicate the movement. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Microsoft builds teleporter weapon to send VMware into Azure
Updated Virtual Machine Converter now converts Linux VMs too
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.