Feeds

NZ boffins anchor new submarine cable

Science likes big bandwidth

High performance access to file storage

New Zealand’s new US$400m submarine communications cable project, Pacific Fibre, has signed Reannz (Research & Education Advanced Network NZ) as its first customer.

The Pacific Fibre undersea cable system will connect Australia to the United States with two fibre optic cables via New Zealand and should bring more competitive pricing to the international transmission market - it will go head-to-head with the incumbent Southern Cross Cable network.

Under the agreement, Reannz is investing its own operational funding, along with a NZ$15 million government-backed grant. Reannz owns and operates Karen, the Kiwi Advanced Research and Education Network, on behalf of New Zealand’s research, education and innovation community, including universities and Crown Research Institutes (CRIs).

The deal will see capacity available to Karen subscribers rise from today’s 1Gb/s to an initial 40Gb/s and then to 160Gb/s.

The value of the capacity commitment is more than NZ$400m at current market rates but, citing economies of scale of the new network, Reannz CEO Donald Clark said the organisation is “paying far less than that”.

Clarke said Pacific Fibre will "provide us with effectively unconstrained capacity to Australia and the USA from mid-2014, allowing us to collaborate with the rest of the world on an equal footing.”

Pacific Fibre CEO Mark Rushworth said the undersea cable system will “unleash the potential of the Australian NBN and New Zealand UFB/RBI projects. It will provide the fastest path to the United States with the most competitive cost basis and help Australia and New Zealand meet the ever-increasing demand for international voice, data and internet content.”

In April, Pacific Fibre invited the submarine cable industry to tender for the construction on the cable network. It hopes to sign a construction contract by Q3 of 2011.

Last month the Pacific Fibre appointed ANZ Bank, Credit Suisse and First NZ Capital to help raise funds for the cable. First NZ Capital and Credit Suisse will seek equity investors, while ANZ will raise debt finance. ANZ said that as lead arranger it intends to provide a significant proportion. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month
... but don't worry, charter members, you're still in 'for life'
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.