Feeds

Aussies stumped reading the phone bill

Calls? You charge me for calls?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Australia may enjoy some of the highest teledensity levels in the world, but the more calls made, the less the understanding of pricing and billing information, claims the Australian Communications and Media Authority.

New research from ACMA reveals that the vast majority of Australian telephone consumers have a “patchy understanding” of how their services are charged.

The research also hints at why Australians might be willing to sacrifice landlines for mobile services: the bundling of free call allowances leaves users with less to misunderstand.

ACMA Chairman, Chris Chapman said that the rise in mobile phone use as a primary communication service (now at 47 percent vs landlines at 33 percent) and the increase in bundled plans have contributed to consumer confusion.

“Both of these trends are major factors contributing to a decline in consumers’ understanding of the price and location information embedded in traditional fixed telephone numbers, meaning that embedding this information may no longer be an effective mechanism to fulfil consumer protection needs,” Chapman said.

Also of concern is consumers’ understanding of less frequently called numbers such as 13/1300 and 1800 numbers. “It seems these are confusing for many Australians compared to more frequently called numbers like mobile and local numbers,” he said.

The research found that one in five Australians was either unable to define a local call from a landline or their explanation was incorrect.

The findings are analysed in the ACMA’s fourth consultation paper in its numbering work program, Numbering: Implications of research into consumer issues. ACMA is seeking feedback on the implications of these findings, including how regulatory arrangements might be adjusted over time to reflect and facilitate changes in consumer communication use including whether telephone numbers remain the most effective strategy for providing price information.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.