Feeds

Winklevoss twins aim Zuckerberg case at Supreme Court

Identical malcontents spy Facebook 'securities fraud'

The essential guide to IT transformation

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, the square-jawed Ivy League twins who were dope-slapped by mean li'l Zucky in the movie The Social Network – oh, and allegedly in real life, as well – have announced that they will take their lawsuit against Zuckerberg to the US Supreme Court.

The Reg's stateside readers must surely feel all warm 'n' fuzzy, knowing that their tax dollars will subsidize the adjudication of whether Cam and Ty were short-sheeted when they accepted a $65m pittance to drop their original suit against Zuckerberg and Facebook.

That settlement, by the way, consisted of a mere $20m in cash and $45m in Facebook shares – which according to some reports are now worth anywhere from $150m to $200m.

The Winklevoss twins, Cameron and Tyler

The Winklevoss twins: Cameron, left (or maybe right), and Tyler, right (or maybe left)

The unfortunate Winklevi were shot down earlier on Monday by the US 9th Circuit Court, which told them, surely in fine legal language, to take their case and essentially to insert it where the sun don't shine.

But did that distinct defeat deter the determinied duo – described in The Social Network's screenplay, by the way, as "identical twins who stepped out of an ad for Abercrombie & Fitch"? Of course not – privilege is not to be denied.

"The Court's decision shut the courthouse door to a solid claim that Facebook obtained this settlement by committing securities fraud," the persistent pair pouted in a statement following the 9th Circuit's decision. "Our Petition to the Supreme Court will ask the high court to decide whether that door should be reopened."

And so the circus continues, with Zuckerberg defending his squillion-dollar social-networking cash machine not only from the Winklevoss twins but also from a wood-pellet salesman who claims he's entitled to half the site's value, with the well-wheeled Winks themselves being sued by a developer for a chunk of their cut, and with Cam and Ty now demanding the attention of the black-robed solemnities sitting on the highest court in the land.

America – is this a great country, or what? ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
Judge nixes HP deal for director amnesty after $8.8bn Autonomy snafu
Lawyers will have to earn their keep the hard way, says court
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.