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Chinese telly to get iPlayer technology

Auntie's streamer chases the dragon

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KIT digital – the owner of ioko, which provides video management software for the BBC's iPlayer* – has signed up to offer a similar service in China.

Nineteen Chinese broadcasters and newspapers have signed up to China United Television (dubbed CUTV, not CHUNT).

CUTV, run by Shenzhen Media Group, will allow millions of Chinese residents to catch up on missed programmes, and watch TV on Android and Apple devices or their PCs.

KIT digital's managing director for Asia-Pacific, Steve Chung, said: "China is central to KIT digital's Asia growth strategy, with Beijing as our regional headquarters, in addition to our local office in Shenzhen, Guangdong."

KIT's press kit is here. ®

* The original version of this story said ioko provided technology behind the iPlayer. This was taken from the company's press release but turned out not to be true. Sorry for any confusion, that'll teach us to believe what we read in press releases.

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