Feeds

Sony Ericsson walks away from Clearwire logo fight

Losing 4G contender looking too poorly to be a threat

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Sony Ericsson has given up its action against Clearwire for having a swirly green logo, as Clearwire concedes it is unlikely to ever launch a competing range of mobile phones.

Sony Ericsson's action was taken in January, when Clearwire was still planning to launch the handsets it announced last year. Since then the operator has seen its core technology, WiMAX, dropped around the world, its primary customer, Sprint, flirting with the competition, and one of its biggest investors, Intel, selling off shares – so Clearwire won't be making phones any time soon.

The company stated as much to the US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, prompting Sony Ericsson to give up its action that had demanded $150,000 in cash along with three times the estimated damages for a confusingly similar green swirl:

Respective logos for comparison

Sony Ericsson is the one on the left ... or possibly the right

Clearwire's network was built using WiMAX, a standard that tried, and failed, to elbow aside LTE and become the accepted standard for 4G. Despite enthusiastic support from Intel, which holds a lot of the WiMAX patents, the standard was never accepted by the network operators, which had already settled on Long Term Evolution (LTE) for their 4G needs. WiMAX came first, and was being deployed years before the LTE standard was ratified, but operators preferred LTE for various technical and political reasons.

These days, even Clearwire is planning to deploy LTE, so Intel has less interest in the company. Last week Intel announced it would be selling 10 per cent of its holding (around 10 million shares). That resulted in Clearwire's share price dropping 16 per cent, despite the chip-maker promising the sale wouldn't impact the business relationship between the two.

Sprint, Clearwire's biggest customer, has been seen talking to potential competitor LightSquared, and Clearwire's own end users are suing for better service while its executives seem to be abandoning ship.

Now it seems that Sony Ericsson has such little faith in the future of Clearwire that it no longer cares if the logos look the same, which is surely the most painful cut of all. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
YOU are the threat: True confessions of real-life sysadmins
Who will save the systems from the men and women who save the systems from you?
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up
Turning it off and on again fixes glitch 12 HOURS LATER
Ofcom snatches 700MHz off digital telly, hands it to mobile data providers
Hungry mobe'n'slab-waving Blighty swallows spectrum
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.