Feeds

Teenage duo sentenced over credit card Ghostmarket

'I will never get a job in IT,' laments hacker

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Two UK teenagers received sentences for repeated hack attacks that stole credit card data and took one online webhost offline.

Zachary Woodham, 19, and Louis Tobenhouse, 18, pleaded guilty to the online offenses in late December, members of the Metropolitan Police Service's Police Central e-Crime Unit said on Monday. Using the hacker alias “Colonel Root,” Woodham repeatedly attacked webhosting company Punkyhosting over several weeks and then sent emails that gloated about his actions.

Police said they eventually identified Woodham as an active participant in Ghostmarket, an online marketplace for stolen wares that also offered tutorials on online scams. Police searching the teens' computers found data for thousands of compromised payment cards and evidence that they targeted online casinos, betting companies and other online firms. Woodham also used some of the stolen cards to pay for access to premium chat lines that he owned.

In March, four people affiliated with Ghostmarket received a combined 15 years in prison. Those sentenced included Nick Webber, then 19 years old, whose computer contained details of thousands of stolen credit cards. He was busted in October 2009 after trying to use a counterfeit credit card to pay for a hotel stay.

Webber and fellow accomplice Gary Kelly, 21, received five years in prison, while cronies Ryan Thomas, 18, received four years, and Shakira Ricardo, 21, was imprisoned for 18 months. Police at the time said Ghostmarket boasted 8,000 members and facilitated a range of crimes including the sale of stolen credit card and personal details.

Woodham and Tobenhouse posted tutorials on Ghostmarket that gave advice on hacking into company websites, committing fraud and evading capture by authorities, police said.

Woodham received a sentence of 18 months imprisonment that will be suspended in two years. Tobenhouse was sentenced to 200 hours of unpaid work.

Upon his arrest, Tobenhouse said: “I will never get a job in IT now.” To which we say: not necessarily. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.