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Adobe lets audio and video onto SendNow file transfer cloud

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Adobe has announced that you can now send audio and video files via SendNow, the file-transfer service the company introduced last November.

SendNow is designed to facilitate the transfer of large files in ways that email can't. "With SendNow, you don't have to worry about email bounces or tricky FTP servers," Acrobat Solutions senior product manager William Lau tells The Register. "There's no IT involvement at any stage of the process, and nothing resides on your desktop."

The service also lets you verify receipt of a file and see when it was actually downloaded.

Next month, Adobe will also let you add your own company logo to SendNow notifications, which show up in email inboxes when a file has been uploaded. And in the third quarter, the company will introduce a desktop application for using SendNow outside the browser.

SendNow is part of Adobe's ever-expanding collection of online services. The company's "cloud" family, as Lau calls it, also includes the Acrobat.com web-conferencing and storage service, a service for building PDFs, another for building forms and surveys, and a tool for converting PDFs to Word documents. These services are aimed at small- to medium-sized businesses, and they're available worldwide.

All five services are priced at about $10 to $20 per month, but there are annual subscription plans as well. Abode also offers free test versions of four of the five services, including SendNow, and these are more limited than the for-pay versions.

The free version of SendNow, for instance, limits you to 100MB on each file and 500MB of total storage, and you can send each file to only 100 different people.The $9.99 per month version lets you send 2GB files, gives you 5GB of storage, and lets you send each file to 200 people, and the $19.99 a month subscription increases these limits to 20GB of total storage and 500 recipients.

SendNow is available at https://sendnow.adobe.com. ®

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