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Home Office appoints Brokenshire as security minister

Hands over drugs, alcohol and violence to Browning

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James Brokenshire has taken over as the UK's security and counter-terrorism minister following the resignation of Baroness Neville-Jones on Monday.

Brokenshire, a former banker and Conservative MP since 2005, was previously parliamentary under secretary for crime reduction before receiving his promotion this week. The crime reduction brief has been handed over to Baroness Angela Browning, who joins the Home Office as minister for crime prevention and anti-social behaviour reduction.

This brief includes responsibility for the drugs strategy, licensing and football safety. Baroness Browning inherits Baroness Neville-Jones role as chief spokesman for the Home Office in the House of Lords.

Neville-Jones announced her departure on Monday, saying she was taking up a post in the private sector. She had been credited with securiting a top tier role for cyber-security. However, she had also reportedly had a less than perfect working relationship with Home Secretary Theresa May.

That should be less of an issue for Brokenshire, who has been in the Home Office team since the coalition coalesced a year ago.®

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