Feeds

David Cameron wants to push all of Blighty online

University places might be a bit sticky, but hell, look at the interwebs!

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Reconditioned computers that cost less than £100 a pop have gone on sale today as part of the government's strategy to get more British people online.

Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude, meanwhile, said this morning that the government's interwebulator sweetheart Martha Lane Fox had been busily recruiting "digital champions" to convince around nine million people in the UK to plug into the net.

An eclectic group of public and private sector organisations have offered up 100,000 employees as bait volunteers who will help get millions of adults online by the time the London 2012 Olympics starts.

Workers from retailer John Lewis, the Post Office, telco BT, bingo hall owner Mecca and electrical warehouse Comet are among the so-called "digital champion volunteer force".

Prime Minister David Cameron, who just yesterday downplayed claims that his education minister wanted to let rich people buy university places, enthused that he was "very keen" to make the UK "the first nation in the world to get everyone online".

He added that he wanted to "ensure that something the vast majority of us take for granted can be enjoyed by all of us".

As for the refurbed, low-cost kit, Remploy is among the providers selling cheap computers in an effort to get more UK people to use the internet.

It's offering reconditioned computers that start at £92 that come with flat screen monitors, mouse and keyboard. The machines are loaded with an operating system and an Office package with warranty, telephone support and delivery, said Remploy.

Three's mobile broadband provides the connectivity and is offering one-month, three-month and 12-month contracts to users who can pay online or offline using a service known as Payzone. Such payments can be made at more than 20,000 sites around Blighty, including at petrol stations and post offices.

"I am excited about the possibilities this low-cost PC presents for the many people in the UK who so far have simply not been able to afford to get online," said Lane Fox. "Remploy's mission is to expand opportunities for disabled and disadvantaged people. The £92 PC now means they are opening doors both online and in the workplace." ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft
Doesn't much like Apple or Google, either
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?