Feeds

Spotify denies movie deals (not very convincingly)

P2P is still the killer app

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Spotify has denied claims it has inked deals with the major Hollywood studios ahead of an expansion into video on demand. Daniel Ek rubbished the report, by Michael Arrington of rumour site TechCrunch, that Spotify had deals in place with four studios.

Not that getting deals signed is any guarantee of progress; Google had them, and lost them, as the reality of Google TV became apparent.

Yet Ek first revealed Spotify's movie ambitions (to this reporter) two years ago – and Spotify has been embedding the software into TVs and making deals with ISPs – neither is new.

Spotify's technology is also vastly superior to its potential rivals in some ways. It would be greeted with relief by ISPs.

Here's why.

The current mania for live streaming of music and video overlooks some huge technical and economic problems in the distribution chain. ISPs hate having to pay for the increase in bandwidth costs that result from the demand for video – without any financial benefit to them. More fool them, you might say, for stubbornly locking themselves into a one-price-fits-all model, and for failing to develop even a basic market of willing payers to offset those costs. Most ISPs would rather put their fingers in their ears than tweak their stone-age pricing.

BT and TalkTalk, for example, have other priorities: chucking a million quid in the UK at a legal challenge to copyright law. Yet their pricing is an economic reality for them for now. Here is where Spotify can offer to help.

Most Spotify users are aware that the client software caches songs, and has a huge appetite for hard disk space. But it's almost forgotten that Spotify was designed as a P2P network: it'll look in other user's caches – and caches close by first. This can save an ISP a lot of money, since the bandwidth costs of traffic within the network are much lower, or non-existent (they've already been accounted for) than shipping bits from outside, or shifting them from a CDN. It's not so useful on 'Long Tail' content, but on popular material, then the bandwidth savings become enormous.

This seems to have been overlooked by TechCrunch, perhaps forgivably, since despite the name, it's not really up on technology.

The chief rivals in the distribution business here are Apple and Google.

Google is also a content delivery network (CDN) now, via the Google Global Cache, or GGC. It's a CDN with Google as its exclusive customer: Google privately caches its video material at peering exchanges; it is possibly the largest CDN by volume in the world.

But Spotify potentially brings the material even closer to the users. Its appeal to an ISP such as Virgin, with whom it is expected to announce a music deal shortly, is obvious. And Spotify has another a huge advantage in the movie distribution business: it's not Google. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
WTF happened to Pac-Man?
In his thirties and still afraid of ghosts
Reg man builds smart home rig, gains SUPREME CONTROL of DOMAIN – Pics
LightwaveRF and Arduino: Bright ideas for dim DIYers
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
Apple patent LOCKS drivers out of their OWN PHONES
I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't let you text that
Microsoft signs Motorola to Android patent pact – no, not THAT Motorola
The part that Google never got will play ball with Redmond
Slip your finger in this ring and unlock your backdoor, phone, etc
Take a look at this new NFC jewellery – why, what were you thinking of?
Happy 25th birthday, Game Boy!
Monochrome handset ushered in modern mobile gaming era
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.