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Fujitsu A/NZ tosses dollars at clouds

New CEO confirms new DCs in Sydney, Melbourne

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Fujitsu has reaffirmed its commitment to the Australian data center sector despite growing competition among providers.

The company, which currently has 10 data centres in Australia, will commission one new facilities in Sydney and another in Melbourne later this year as part of a AUD$100 million investment announced first last year.

Freshly appointed Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand CEO Mike Foster confirmed the investment to ComputerWorld, claiming that the rise in demand for secure cloud services in the country has sparked additional commitment to infrastructure.

Growth in financial services, government and the resources sector have also led to increased demand.

He added that the A$100 million data centre splurge in Australia would include expansion of existing capacity in Perth, Sydney and Melbourne.

In March Fujitsu New Zealand announced that it would invest NZ$80 million in funding for two new data centres in Auckland and Wellington.

Foster, a former Telstra executive was appointed to the new role in late April replacing former CEO Rod Vawdrey who has been elevated to President of Fujitsu’s Global Business Group. ®

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