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Stolen smart-meter SIM leads to outrageous 3G bill

Tasmanian woman downloads herself into the slammer

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Skeptics who think 3G data services can’t be used for volume downloads, think again: a Tasmanian woman has been jailed for racking up a bill of nearly A$200,000 on a SIM stolen from an electricity smart-meter.

According to the Hobart Mercury the woman, Kylie Monks, used a SIM card from an Aurora electricity meter that connected to the Telstra NextG network. She then went on an impressive spree of downloads and calls. Aurora only noticed the theft of the SIM when it received a three-month phone bill of A$193,187.43.

Police alleged she used the SIM to access Facebook and download “dozens of” movies. Monks had claimed the SIM was given to her by a man called Freeman, and that she had destroyed it when she realized it did not belong to him.

Monks was convicted for computer-related fraud, receiving stolen property and making a false declaration, and was sentenced to 18 months in jail. The last 12 months has been suspended with a three-year good behaviour bond.

Aurora Energy says it has taken steps to prevent further SIM thefts. ®

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