Feeds

Son of AV tycoon rescued following 'stupid' kidnapping

Ivan Kaspersky safe and sound

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The kidnapped son of Kaspersky Lab's CEO was freed over the weekend following blunders by his captors that led to the arrest of five people accused of abducting him and charging €​3 million in ransom.

Russian authorities freed 20-year-old Ivan Kaspersky after storming the Moscow home where he was being held, The Moscow Times reported on Monday. Police learned his whereabouts by tracking the signal of a cellphone that called Kaspersky Lab boss and cofounder Eugene Kaspersky to make the ransom demand.

Police lured four of the suspects from the home by asking them to collect a down payment and then stopped them on the pretext of a routine document check, the paper said. The suspects were detained at the same time the police freed the younger Kaspersky, who was being held in the home's banya – a traditional Russian bath.

“Police officers working on the case were astonished with how stupid and audacious the kidnapping was,” an official told Interfax.

The suspected ringleader was identified as Nikolai Savelyev, 61, who reportedly has a criminal record on unspecified charges. He was allegedly aided by his wife, Lyudmila Savelyeva, 64, a son who is also named Nikolai, and two of the son's friends.

Savelyev hatched the scheme in an attempt to pay off debts. Eugene Kaspersky's riches have been estimated by Fortune magazine at $800 million.

“Kaspersky Lab confirms that an operation to free Ivan Kaspersky was carried out successfully by the Federal Security Service (FSB), the Criminal Investigation Department of the Moscow Police and Kaspersky Lab's own security personnel,” the company said in a statement. “Ivan is alive and well and is currently located at a safe location. No ransom was paid during the rescue operation.”

Police deliberately spread false information about the kidnapping to journalists, explaining why there was conflicting information in many of the reports about whether the elder Kaspersky was working with police or had agreed to pay the demanded ransom.

Ivan Kaspersky was abducted on Tuesday in the northwest part of Moscow on his way to work.

Every year, an estimated 200 to 300 children of rich parents are kidnapped in Russia, ABC News reported. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods
Not just web servers under threat - though TENS of THOUSANDS have been hit
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Who.is does the Harlem Shake
Blame it on LOLing XSS terroristas
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.