Feeds

Hacker cops to payment card fraud worth more than $36m

Faces 10 years and $500,000 in fines

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

An American citizen has admitted to stealing data for more than 676,000 payment cards from databases he hacked into and netting more than $100,000 by selling them in underground bazaars online.

Rogelio Hackett, 26, of Lithonia, Georgia, pleaded guilty to one count of access device fraud and one count of aggravated identity theft. He admitted a computer-hacking spree that started in the late 1990s and turned criminal in 2002, when he began carrying out SQL injection attacks on vulnerable websites that accepted credit cards to transact purchases. In 2007, he exploited the server of an unnamed online ticket seller and made off with data for some 360,000 cards, prosecutors said.

He sold the stolen data on websites and IRC channels frequented by fellow credit card fraudsters, charging $20 to $25 per account. According to court documents, he used his riches to buy luxury items, including a 2001 BMW X5 and a pair of Louis Vuitton shoes.

Hackett's undoing started in June 2009 when he sold 40 counterfeit cards for $1,180 to an undercover US Secret Service agent. A raid on his home uncovered the huge cache of stolen data, as well as equipment for making counterfeit cards. The stolen data was used to make more than $36 million worth of fraudulent transactions, prosecutors said.

Hackett faces a maximum of 10 years in prison and fines of at least $500,000. He also faces an additional mandatory two years in prison on the identity theft charge. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Knock Knock tool makes a joke of Mac AV
Yes, we know Macs 'don't get viruses', but when they do this code'll spot 'em
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Why weasel words might not work for Whisper
CEO suspends editor but privacy questions remain
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
BlackEnergy crimeware coursing through US control systems
US CERT says three flavours of control kit are under attack
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.