Feeds

Watchdog sniffs Rihanna's 'gently thrusting buttocks'

X Factor cleared of punting filth to kiddies

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

ITV will not face action from TV watchdog Ofcom over X Factor performances by Rihanna and Christina Aguilera, despite the Daily Mail's insistence that the pair punted filth to wide-eyed kiddies.

The two artists appeared on The X Factor Final on Saturday, 11 December. Rihanna performed What's My Name "in a dress which was removed by a dancer during the performance to reveal a strapless top and high waisted pants".

Aguilera offered viewers Express from the film Burlesque, featuring "the singer with a number of dancers performing in a burlesque style of dance and dress".

Both acts appeared before the 9pm watershed, prompting 2,868 complaints that the two "performed in a very sexual manner" and the content "was too sexually explicit and inappropriate for the young audience of this show".

Before considering whether ITV was in breach of Rules 1.3 and 2.3 of the Code ("Children must be protected by appropriate scheduling from material that is unsuitable for them", and "In applying generally accepted standards broadcasters must ensure that material which may cause offence is justified by the context", respectively), Ofcom pointedly remarked:

Approximately 2,000 of the 2,868 complaints about this programme were received following coverage about the performances in a daily national newspaper. The newspaper coverage reported on concerns that the performances were too explicit for a family programme, and included a number of still images of the performances.

However, from a comparison of the images it is clear that the photographs that were published in the newspaper were significantly more graphic and close-up than the material that had been broadcast in the programme, and had been taken from a different angle to the television cameras. Readers of the newspaper would have therefore been left with the impression that the programme contained significantly more graphic material than had actually been broadcast.

The Daily Mail's rabble-rousing failed to convince Ofcom that the X Factor had left thousands of traumatised children in its wake.

Regarding Rihanna, it ruled that "the performer and the dancers were in Ofcom's opinion adequately dressed with clothing covering their buttocks".

It added: "The part of the dance routine which featured some gentle thrusting of the buttocks by Rihanna was in keeping with her performing style, suitably limited and brief in duration, and in Ofcom's view was suitable for a pre-watershed audience."

While Aguilera's performance was "at the very margin of acceptability" for pre-watershed broadcast, Ofcom considered there was "editorial justification for the type of costumes that the dancers were wearing, and the style of the dance routine overall".

Accordingly, the watchdog ruled that both performances were "not in breach of Rules 1.3 and 2.3". The full-fat adjudication can be found on page 30 of this pdf. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Are you a fat boy? Get to university NOW, you PENNILESS SLACKER
Rotund types paid nearly 20% less than people who didn't eat all the pies
Emma Watson should SHUT UP, all this abuse is HER OWN FAULT
... said an anon coward who we really wish hadn't posted on our website
Japan develops robot CHEERLEADERS which RIDE on BALLS
'Will put smiles on faces worldwide', predicts corporate PR chief
Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city
Belgian booze pumped from underground
Oz carrier Tiger Air takes terror alerts to new heights
Don't doodle, it might cost you your flight
Amazon: Wish in one hand, Twit in the other – see which one fills first
#AmazonWishList A year's supply of Arran scotch, ta
Let it go, Steve: Ballmer bans iPads from his LA Clippers b-ball team
Can you imagine the scene? 'Hey guys, it's your new owner – WTF is that on your desk?'
Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us
Aye, shipmate, it be just like that Minority Report
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.