Feeds

Google to sell subscriptions to Chrome OS notebooks?

$10 to $20 a month for web happy hardware

The essential guide to IT transformation

Google will sell Chrome OS notebooks and accompanying software services for a $10 to $20 monthly subscription fee, according to a report citing a "reliable source".

Neowin reports that for those paying a subscription fee, Google will provide "hardware refreshes" as they become available and replace faulty hardware for the duration of the subscription. Asked to comment on the report, a Google spokeswoman said: "We don’t have anything to share at this time".

Machines running Google's browser-based operating system are due to arrive in the "middle" of the year. According to Neowin, this means June or July, which sounds like a mighty good guess. Google originally said that the first systems would arrive by the end of last year, but in December, it pushed the release back and offered "beta" machines to a relatively small group of reporters and testers.

The company has not said how the machines will be priced. But it has revealed that the first systems will come from Acer and Samsung.

The Neowin report is light on details. But it says devices will be sold "as part of a subscription based model with Gmail to customers", but apparently, the machines will not be purchased directly from Google.

Gmail is, of course, a free consumer service. This may indicate that Google and its partners will offer machines to business customers in tandem with the for-pay version of Google Apps. Systems will also be available for a traditional one-time fee, Neowin said.

Chrome OS is essentially Google's Chrome browser running atop a Linux kernel. The browser is the only local application. All other apps must be run inside the browser. Google has an interest in pushing users towards web-based applications, including its Google Apps suite of office tools, but the company also says that Chrome OS is an effort to improve security. Each online app is confined to its own sandbox, and the OS attempts to identify malware at startup via a verified boot. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?