Feeds

Short domain land-rush coming to .uk

bj.me.uk could be yours for a tenner

Business security measures using SSL

Nominet is to make thousands of super-short .uk web addresses available for as little as £10 each in a "land rush", due to kick off next month.

The .uk manager will release 2,640 previously reserved one- and two-character .co.uk, .org.uk, .net.uk and .me.uk domain names, starting 23 May.

Many single-letter and single-number addresses, such as 1.co.uk and x.co.uk, will be made available, along with hundreds of double-character domains.

If you're a deodorant company, this is your chance to pick up bo.co.uk. Doctors could apply for dr.org.uk. If you're feeling frisky, bj.me.uk is also up for grabs.

The full list can be downloaded, in PDF format, here (15-page PDF/396 KB).

Nominet said that interested parties will have from 23 May to 15 June to pay a £10 application fee, which will enable them to bid on the domains. Uncontested domains will be allocated 23 June.

Any domain with more than one application will head to an auction, which begins 20 July, with the proceeds being given to the charitable Nominet Trust.

Apart from a handful of two-letter domains that were registered prior to Nominet's formation, such as bt.co.uk, it's been impossible to register anything shorter than three characters since 1996.

Short web addresses are considered to be high-value assets. Interest among domain name speculators is likely to be high, so competition could be fierce.

A couple of hundred of these short domains have already been allocated to trademark-holders under two recently concluded "sunrise" periods.

B&Q is now the proud owner of bq.co.uk, and Yahoo! has added y.co.uk to its portfolio.

Half a dozen domains from contested sunrise applications have already been sold at auction – aa.co.uk was won by American Airlines and e.co.uk was sold to E! Entertainment Television, for example – raising almost £24,000 for the Nominet Trust.

If any of the 2,640 available domains are still unclaimed by 27 June, they will be released on a first-come, first-served basis via the usual channels. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.