Feeds

Iran lays blame for Stuxnet worm on Siemens

SCADA maker 'provided the enemies' with help

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

A senior Iranian commander has accused the German engineering firm Siemens of helping the US and Israeli to build the Stuxnet computer worm that infiltrated his country's nuclear facilities.

The claim by Brigadier General Gholam Reza Jalali came on Saturday in the Islamic Republic News Service, Iran's state news agency, which goes by the acronym IRNA. Jalali said that Siemens, which built the industrial control system that was sabotaged by Stuxnet, should be called on to account for the help it provided to a team of programmers who built the highly sophisticated worm.

As previously reported, the malware attacked SCADA – supervisory control and data acquisition – software used to control gas-centrifuge motors inside Iranian nuclear plants.

“Siemens should explain why and how it provided the enemies with the information about the codes of the SCADA software and prepared the ground for a cyber attack against us,” Jalali told IRNA. “It was a hostile action which could have inflicted serious damage on the country if it had not been dealt with in a timely manner.”

He went on to say that Iran's Foreign Ministry should lodge complaints in international courts to hold the US and Israel legally responsible.

The comments come three months after The New York Times reported that Stuxnet was jointly developed by programmers from Israel and the US. Citing unnamed sources, the NYT said that Siemens in 2008 worked with teams at the Idaho National Laboratory to identify vulnerabilities in its SCADA software.

Jalali's remarks were the first time an Iranian official has directly fingered Israel, the US or Siemens in the attack, although President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has on several occasions blamed the two countries for trying to disrupt his government.

Jalali repeated claims made by Ahmadinejad that Stuxnet had little effect on his country's nuclear-enrichment program because the worm was quickly contained after it infected SCADA systems. Assessments from security researchers at Symantec and elsewhere, have claimed that Stuxnet repeatedly attacked five industrial plants inside Iran over a 10-month period. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Ice cream headache as black hat hacks sack Dairy Queen
I scream, you scream, we all scream 'DATA BREACH'!
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU
Give us your metadata, we'll publish your data
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?