Feeds

NASA hands out second-hand shuttles

Orbiters' final homes announced

Intelligent flash storage arrays

NASA administrator Charles Bolden yesterday announced just where the four remaining space shuttles will find a final home, as the agency celebrated the 30th anniversary of the first orbiter launch on 12 April, 1981*.

The details are:

  • Atlantis – Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.
  • Discovery – The Udvar-Hazy Center at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum (Chantilly, Virginia).
  • Endeavour – The California Science Center (Los Angeles).
  • Enterprise (currently on display at the National Air and Space Museum) – Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum (New York).

Bolden said: "We want to thank all of the locations that expressed an interest in one of these national treasures. This was a very difficult decision, but one that was made with the American public in mind. In the end, these choices provide the greatest number of people with the best opportunity to share in the history and accomplishments of NASA's remarkable Space Shuttle Program. These facilities we've chosen have a noteworthy legacy of preserving space artifacts and providing outstanding access to US and international visitors."

Enterprise on display at the Udvar-Hazy Center. Pic: Smithsonian National Air and Space MuseumEnterprise (pictured) was the first shuttle built, used for atmospheric flight and ground testing. Discovery retired on 9 March this year, at the end of its 39th mission. Endeavour's swansong mission is slated to blast off on 29 April, and NASA has a planned final trip for Atlantis to the ISS pencilled in for 28 June.

NASA is also handing out hundreds of shuttle bits and pieces. Visitors to the the Museum of Flight in Seattle will enjoy a full fuselage trainer, while a nose cap assembly and crew compartment trainer will make its way to National Museum of the US Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.

Furthermore, schools and universities who "want to share technology and a piece of space history with their students" by getting their hands on a shuttle heat tile are invited to make their pitch here.

NASA has more on the hand-out here. ®

Bootnote

* Columbia, carrying commander John Young and pilot Robert Crippen.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
MARS NEEDS WOMEN, claims NASA pseudo 'naut: They eat less
'Some might find this idea offensive' boffin admits
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
No sail: NASA spikes Sunjammer
'Solar sail' demonstrator project binned
Carry On Cosmonaut: Willful Child is a poor taste Star Trek parody
Cringeworthy, crude and crass jokes abound in Steven Erikson’s sci-fi debut
Origins of SEXUAL INTERCOURSE fished out of SCOTTISH LAKE
Fossil find proves it first happened 385 million years ago
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.