Feeds

Nokia gets touchy-feely with two new Symbians

A brilliant business QWERTY, and a Gothic nightmare...

Security for virtualized datacentres

Echo, echo, echo...

There are strong design echoes of this Siemens phone – which was also a Symbian device ... and was not a great success. Although that keypad can't have helped, there.

"There's nothing like it on the market," Nokia said today, referring to the X7. "There are whole swathes of black boxes out there with touch screens." But the X7's styling isn't special enough to stand-out, and is likely to repel as many potential customers as it attracts, while the software lets it down. How Nokia thinks it can command a premium pricing of €380 is beyond me.

Both are due in Q2, the E6 with a price of €340.

The new 'Anna' release of Symbian sees another new icon set, also from Nokia's London design team, in the now increasingly deserted Great Pulteney Street complex.

This one reduces all the previously distinctive shapes to a lozenge-shape, and looks very similar to the new Ubuntu Unity Dock. On the 4-inch X7 screen they're gigantic. The major criticisms of the previous design is that they were toy-like and didn't differentiate between folders and applications. The new set doesn't do anything to address either criticism.

You are in a twisty grid of icons... all alike

Other changes include a portrait QWERTY keyboard (a huge omission from earlier touchscreens), and the ability to see what you're typing in context. Previously, you couldn't – so if you were typing a CAPTCHA you had to cancel the text you had input and find a piece of paper to write it down on. Anna also has a slightly improved web browser, based on existing code. It certainly feels fast and usable, although a little sensitive to the touch.

The changes will be rolled out to existing N8, C7, C6-01 and E7 customers as promised.

Alas, the new corporate font wasn't ready in time. It will be rolled out across the new phones (and investor relations statements) throughout 2011, we're told. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
Turn OFF your phone or WE'LL ALL DI... live? Europe OKs mobes, tabs non-stop on flights
Airlines given green light to allow gate-to-gate jibber-jabber
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.