Feeds

Pac Fibre invites tenders for Au-NZ-US cable

Build our network, [insert name here]

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Pacific Fibre has announced that it has invited the submarine cable industry to tender for building its proposed Australia-New Zealand-US link.

If built, the link would expand both capacity and competition on the route. Today, the route is served by the dual-path Southern Cross Cable Network and Telstra's Endeavour cable.

Pacific Fibre also plans to take a small slice off trans-Pacific latency by skipping the traditional touch-point in Hawaii, opting instead for a direct route.

The company's announcement says it has sent its 450-page invitation to selected vendors to bid on the 5.12 Tbps, two-pair fibre system. It hopes to sign a construction contract by Q3 of 2011.

Pacific Fibre also confirmed that it will be "going it alone", without former partner Pacnet.

"A joint build Memorandum of Understanding expired earlier this year," wrote CEO Mark Rushworth. "We have been assuming a solo-build system for several months now and remain firmly on track to finance and deliver the system in 2013." ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.