Feeds

HP taps Google's print server in the sky

Print jobs via interwebs

Boost IT visibility and business value

HP has announced that its ePrint printers are the first to support Google Cloud Print, a service that lets print via the interwebs.

"With HP ePrint and cloud-aware printers, you get the best experience printing via Google Cloud Print," crowed Stephen Nigro headman of HP's Imaging and Printing Group in a canned statement.

Google director of product management Mike Jazayeri also took a moment to crow, and to clarify that HP's ePrint printers – available in OfficeJet, PhotoSmart, Envy, and LaserJet incarnations – aren't the only devices to benefit from his company's cloudy service. "While cloud printing is possible with any printer that is connected to a PC," he said, "users can achieve a more streamlined, intuitive experience by printing directly to a cloud-ready printer."

In other words, if your printer can talk to Google's Cloud Print APIs – as do HP's ePrint devices – you can print directly to them by sending your print job to Google's servers, which check to see if your Cloud Print–enabled printer is registered with the service. If so, off the print job goes, and your printer spits it out.

If your printer is not Cloud Print–enabled, it needs to be connected to a PC that's connected to the intertubes.

In a blog post on Thursday, Google software engineer Abhijit Kalamkar boasted that "you can already use Google Cloud Print on Chrome notebooks" as well as the mobile versions of Gmail and Google Docs, a third-party Android app, a Chrome extension,j and Firefox add-on.

Kalamkar's mention of "Chome notebooks", of course, refers to a rather limited set of, well, one model – and that one, the Google Cr-48, is still a beta baby, only available to a select few developers, opinion-makers, and other random souls.

Google Cloud Print was first revealed last April as a service in support of Mountain View's browser-based Chrome OS, which was at that time intended to appear at the end of 2010. At its announcement, Cloud Print was also said to be able to print from other devices as well, though Chrome OS was its prime raison d'être.

When Chrome OS slipped its due date – Google now says it'll appear in "mid-2011" in devices from Acer and Samsung – Cloud Print took on a life of its own, launching in December 2010.

But it wasn't until this Thursday that all the parts came together: Cloud Print, Cloud Print–ready apps such as mobile versions of Gmail and Google Docs, and now Cloud Print–ready printers from HP. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes
Linux Foundation lights a fire under storage devs with new conference
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Gamma's not a goner! UK ISP sorts out major outage
Says BT is the root of the problem
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.