Feeds

Dell, HP badmouth Apple's iPad

'Just absurd' (much like Dell's math)

Business security measures using SSL

A top Dell marketeer says that Apple's "magical and revolutionary" fondleslab is doomed to enterprise irrelevancy, and an HP senior vice president blasted Apple's partner policies as being "just absurd."

My, how novel: competitors bashing a front-runner. In other news, Pope Benedict XVI has been revealed to be a Roman Catholic, and a common ursus americanus was discovered relieving himself in a shady copse.

"Apple is great if you've got a lot of money and live on an island," Dell global enterprise marketing honcho Andy Lark told CIO Australia. "It's not so great if you have to exist in a diverse, open, connected enterprise; simple things become quite complex."

Explaining Dell's OS strategy, Lark added. "We will do Windows 7 coupled with Android Honeycomb, and we're really excited. We think that giving people that choice is very important."

Reasonable arguments with which some might agree and some might disagee – but Lark soon drove his précis off a precipice. "An iPad with a keyboard, a mouse and a case [means] you'll be at $1,500 or $1,600; that's double of what you're paying," he said.

Even if he was talking Oz dollars – $1,500 in US greenbacks buys about 1,450 copper disks emblazoned with QE II and her five kangaroos – Lark is a wee bit off the mark with his calculations. Considering that iPads run from between $579 to $949 in down-under dollars, perhaps he was thinking of protecting his M&R tablet with CrystalRoc's Swarovski crystal–encrusted iPad 2 case, which would set him back $700. American.

And a mouse? Although it is possible to hook up a Bluetooth mouse to a jailbroken iPad using BTstack, that doesn't really seem to be an enterprise-y thing to do, now, does it?

The channel arguments put forth by Stephen DeWitt, senior vice president of HP's Americas Solution Partners Organization, at his company's Americas Partner Conference (APC) in Las Vegas were more persuasive, dealing as they did with the difficulty of working with the elusive Apple Channel Programs.

"Apple's relationship with partners is transactional, completely. Apple doesn’t have an inclusive philosophy of partner capabilities, and that's just absurd," CRN quotes DeWitt as saying in an interview during the gathering.

DeWitt, of course, has a self-serving reason to call attention to Cupertino's less-than-supportive attitude to its partners: HP needs partners and developers to rally 'round its webOS, despite the strong head start enjoyed by Apple's iOS and Google's Android.

To juice the process, DeWitt said that HP will soon roll webOS and mobility developer services into its PartnerONE support and incentives program.

"This will bring new partners to us because we are getting into the application space, which involves muscles that we haven't exercised in some time," he said, admitting that attracting a horde of webOS developers won't happen overnight. "This is new business for our partners, and its new business for HP, and we're going to learn where we need to invest."

Prying loose developers from Apple's grasp won't be a walk in the park. The success of iOS and the lure of iOS-fueled profits were powerful enough to sell all 5,000 tickets – at a cool $1,599 a pop – for Jobs & Co's upcoming Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in just 10 hours.

Despite the iOS money spigot and the cool warm-up jackets Apple handed out at last year's WWDC, not all devs are enamored with the treatment they receive from their Cupertinian overloads – at least in comparison with how they're treated by other company's developer support systems. "Unlike Apple, HP is very channel friendly," one unnamed source told CRN. "And if you have an issue with HP you can pick up the phone and talk to someone. That's something that's impossible with Apple. As an Apple partner, I can say that it really feels like they're holding you hostage sometimes."

Comments like that are undoubtedly music to DeWitt's ears. Despite Apple's multimillion iOS-device head start, HP's deep enterprise experience gives it and its webOS platform – and its partners, developers, and VARs – an advantage that Cupertino lacks. ®

Bootnote

Exactly how unhelpful can Apple be to VARs? Two years ago, one CRN contributor recounted the sad saga of his personal experience with the Apple Channel Program, an experience that he said taught him the true meaning of that company's address: One Infinite Loop.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch
For decades Hollywood actually binned its 4K files. Doh!
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster
4 Minute Mile project hatched to speed up tired troops
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears
RIP 2001 – 2014. MP3 player beloved of millions. Killed by cloud
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.