Feeds

New York vows review of AT&T deal

'They last thing we need is higher wireless prices'

High performance access to file storage

New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman has announced that his office will carry out a thorough review of AT&T's proposed acquisition of T-Mobile USA.

"Cell phones are no longer a luxury for a few among us, but a basic necessity. The last thing New Yorkers need during these difficult economic times is to see cell phone prices rise," Schneiderman said in a statement. "Affordable wireless service and technology, including smart phones and next generation handheld devices, are the bridge to the digital broadband future. We want to ensure all New Yorkers benefit from these important innovations that improve lives."

An announcement from Schneiderman's office said that the merger might have a particular impact on cities such as Rochester, Albany, Buffalo, and Syracuse, where there are already fewer wireless network options. But the announcement also said that the attorney general is concerned that the merger could effect consumers and businesses across the state.

Early last week, AT&T told the world it had agreed to acquire T-Mobile USA from Deutsche Telekom in a deal valued at roughly $39bn. AT&T runs what is likely the largest wireless network in the US, with about 95.5 million subscribers, and T-Mobile runs the fourth largest, with 23 million. Whereas the other two players – Verizon and Sprint – offer networks based on the CDMA standard, AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM, the same technology used in most major markets across the rest of the world.

In his announcement, Schneiderman said that his office would takes pains to examine the potential benefits of the deal. AT&T has argued that the acquisition will more quickly bring 4G wireless broadband to the country and that it's taking a American operator out of the hands of a foreign company.

The Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Justice will also examine the merger. Late last week, speaking with The Wall Street Journal, an unnamed FCC official indicated that the merger would have a tough time winning approval from the commission. "There's no way the [FCC] chairman's office rubber-stamps this transaction. It will be a steep climb to say the least," the official said. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.