Feeds

Pr0n domain approved by ICANN

.XXX gets thumbs up. Again

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The ICANN approved the porn domain. Again.

On Friday, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) announced that it had entered an agreement with ICM Registry that allows the company to run .XXX as a top-level domain.

"ICANN’s decision to give .XXX final approval is a landmark moment for the internet," reads a canned statement from ICM CEO Stuart Lawley. "For the first time there will be a clearly defined web address for adult entertainment, out of the reach of minors and as free as possible from fraud or malicious computer viruses.

“We believe consumers will be more prepared to make purchases on .XXX sites, safe in the knowledge their payments will be secure. Tens of thousands of adult entertainment website owners recognize the business benefits of .XXX and have already applied to pre-reserve over 200,000 .XXX domains.”

.XXX is designated as a sponsored top-level domain, so it will only be available to the adult-entertainment industry, and all applications must be approved by the International Foundation for Online Responsibility (IFFOR).

The top-level porn domain was first proposed by ICM Registry in 2000. In 2005, ICANN - the net's overseeing body - approved the proposal. But after opposition from the US and various other governments, the organization ended up rejecting the thing – on three separate occasions. The last rejection came in 2007, but in early 2010, an independent panel of judges ruled that ICANN was out of line. The 2007 rejection, the panel said, was "not consistent with the application of neutral, objective, and fair documented policy."

The ICANN board was not obliged to obey the panel decision. But it has.

The Free Speech Coalition (FSC) – a group representing the adult entertainment industry – has long opposed the .XXX domain. Adult entertainment industry representatives protested the domain on Thursday outside the San Francisco hotel where ICANN was set to vote on .XXX at its Silicon Valley meeting.

“Of course we are disappointed but we are not surprised by the ICANN Board’s decision. As voiced in concerns by speakers at this very conference, the ICANN Board has dangerously undervalued the input from governments worldwide,” FSC executive director Diane Duke said in a statement after Friday's vote.

“Worse, they have disregarded the overwhelming outpouring of opposition from the adult entertainment industry – the supposed sponsorship community – dismissing the interests of free speech on the Internet.”

If ICANN had not approved the domain, it's almost certain that someone else would have gone after the domain when ICANN begins accepting applications for the new generic top-level domains, which will likely happen later this year. This would probably have meant a lawsuit from ICM. But as it stands, ICANN may see a lawsuit from the Free Speech Coalition. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.