Feeds

Prof debuts miniature laser diode for fast networking

And even faster hair removal

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Miniature laser diodes emitting intense single wavelength light could speed data networking.

A professor Denis Deppe of the University of Central Florida has invented a new small laser diode that has fewer impurities in it. This brings several benefits.

Firstly, the emitted light has a single wavelength, making its detection easier. Secondly, the light is very intense although it does need a high voltage to create it. Thirdly, the diode itself is stronger than current diodes and more resistant to cracking and failure.

Deppe says these advantages makes it a good fit for laser requirements in CD and DVD players, optical mice, laser pointers – but really, this is not "big" news, and data networking, where it could potentially be huge. He says the small size of his laser diodes, their purity level and cracking resistance means they could be embedded inside optical cables and used for heavy data transmission.

Deppe said: "The new laser diodes represent a sharp departure from past commercial devices in how they are made. The new devices show almost no change in operation under stress conditions that cause commercial devices to rapidly fail... At the speed at which the industry is moving, I wouldn't be surprised if in four to five years, when you go to Best Buy to buy cables for all your electronics, you'll be selecting cables with laser diodes embedded in them."

One problem area is the relatively high voltage needed to make the diodes work, but Deppe seems confident that this problem can be cracked.

The university release says: "Massive amounts of data could be moved across great distances almost instantaneously ... By using the tiny lasers in optical clocks, the precision of GPS and high-speed wireless data communications also would increase."

It goes on to say: "They could be used in lasers in space to remove unwanted hair." Imagine that. Fancy a Brazilian in orbit? ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
IBM rides nightmarish hardware landscape on OpenPOWER Consortium raft
Google mulls 'third-generation of warehouse-scale computing' on Big Blue's open chips
It's GOOD to get RAIN on your upgrade parade: Crucial M550 1TB SSD
Performance tweaks and power savings – what's not to like?
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.