Feeds

Prof debuts miniature laser diode for fast networking

And even faster hair removal

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Miniature laser diodes emitting intense single wavelength light could speed data networking.

A professor Denis Deppe of the University of Central Florida has invented a new small laser diode that has fewer impurities in it. This brings several benefits.

Firstly, the emitted light has a single wavelength, making its detection easier. Secondly, the light is very intense although it does need a high voltage to create it. Thirdly, the diode itself is stronger than current diodes and more resistant to cracking and failure.

Deppe says these advantages makes it a good fit for laser requirements in CD and DVD players, optical mice, laser pointers – but really, this is not "big" news, and data networking, where it could potentially be huge. He says the small size of his laser diodes, their purity level and cracking resistance means they could be embedded inside optical cables and used for heavy data transmission.

Deppe said: "The new laser diodes represent a sharp departure from past commercial devices in how they are made. The new devices show almost no change in operation under stress conditions that cause commercial devices to rapidly fail... At the speed at which the industry is moving, I wouldn't be surprised if in four to five years, when you go to Best Buy to buy cables for all your electronics, you'll be selecting cables with laser diodes embedded in them."

One problem area is the relatively high voltage needed to make the diodes work, but Deppe seems confident that this problem can be cracked.

The university release says: "Massive amounts of data could be moved across great distances almost instantaneously ... By using the tiny lasers in optical clocks, the precision of GPS and high-speed wireless data communications also would increase."

It goes on to say: "They could be used in lasers in space to remove unwanted hair." Imagine that. Fancy a Brazilian in orbit? ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
SDI wars: WTF is software defined infrastructure?
This time we play for ALL the marbles
'Urika': Cray unveils new 1,500-core big data crunching monster
6TB of DRAM, 38TB of SSD flash and 120TB of disk storage
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Oracle hires former SAP exec for cloudy push
'We know Larry said cloud was gibberish, and insane, and idiotic, but...'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.