Feeds

Java daddy: 'Aggressively stupid' won't work for Oracle

Gosling says self interest rules

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Oracle has got no choice but to get it right on Java, according to Java founder James Gosling, who has voiced some support for the database giant's proposed changes.

According to Infoworld, Gosling is told told TheServerSide Java Symposium that with a large part of Oracle's business dependent on Java, "it's in their own self interest not to be aggressively stupid."

Oracle's entire middleware line is built on Java. The company paid $8.5bn to own BEA Systems' WebLogic Application Server, and it shelled out a further $5.6bn for Sun Microsystems, grabbing Java itself. Before that, Oracle was already vested in Java through its existing application server, since spiked for WebLogic, and the JDeveloper IDE.

Last year, Oracle told the group responsible for approving changes to Java - the Java Community Process (JCP) - that it was going ahead with its Java Standard Edition (Java SE) roadmap no matter what. Oracle also told the JCP it would not grant a license to the Apache Software Foundation's (ASF's) Java implementation, Project Harmony.

Back to to 2007, when Sun owned Java and dominated the JCP and Oracle was a mere JCP member, Oracle joined others in demanding Harmony be granted a Java license. Oracle also submitted a vote that the JCP be turned into an "open independent vendor-neutral Standards organization" free from the control of any one company.

But now, Oracle is running the show, thanks to its acquisition of Sun. Gosling, once a Sun fellow and vice president, told TSS: "They [Oracle] basically admitted that we were doing the right thing."

Gosling served briefly as Oracle's chief technology officer for client software, leaving in April 2010. For the record, the company was "an extremely unpleasant environment."

According to numerous Tweets from TSS in Las Vegas, Nevada, Gosling said he was pleased that Oracle added "a bunch of UI stuff" to JDK7, submitted by Oracle to the JCP in November and due for completion in July this year.

In other Tweeted comments, Gosling said he "could hardly care less" about the Java language. The Java Virtual Machine (JVM) is now the important thing. Engineers at Sun had been working on making other languages run in the JVM before Oracle bought Sun.

Also, he said that Java Enterprise Edition (EE) 6 makes it "remarkably easy" to build Web apps and "that the word cloud has become really, really annoying". Oracle's just submitted Java EE 7 to the JCP as part of a roadmap to make Java better suited to building Java apps for the cloud. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft refuses to nip 'Windows 9' unzip lip slip
Look at the shiny Windows 8.1, why can't you people talk about 8.1, sobs an exec somewhere
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?