Feeds

Microsoft drops Windows desktop virtualization pair

Skinny clients coming

Security for virtualized datacentres

Microsoft is prolonging the life of Windows XP apps with the latest release of its MED-V desktop virtualization software.

MED-V is pitched by Microsoft as something to help customers migrate from Windows XP to Windows 7, letting Windows XP apps run in the new operating system environment.

Version 2.0 – released Thursday for customers on Microsoft volume licensing agreements and members of MSDN and TechNet – allows MED-V workspaces to be distributed and managed with existing systems like System Center Configuration Manager 2007 R2 or higher.

MED-V 2.0 has also been updated so users can save their Windows passwords, and it supports USB devices like smartcard readers.

Microsoft was once again at pains to differentiate MED-V from the Windows XP Mode that shipped with Windows 7 and also let Windows XP apps run in the new OS.

MED-V adds more enterprise features, Microsoft said. These include the ability to use a custom Windows XP image, automate first time setup, and control URL redirection for Internet Explorer.

MED-V 2.0 accompanied the arrival of App-V 4.6 Service Pack (SP) 1, the update to Microsoft's application virtualization software. App-V turns applications into software that's managed centrally and that's not installed locally on the client machine.

The SP introduces Package Accelerators that let you automatically create App-V application packages using application-installation files instead of "text-based recipes".

Microsoft's planning a series of Package Accelerators for its products, starting with Microsoft Project 2010 in April, with Accelerators coming for Adobe Reader 9.4 and others.

App-V 4.6 SP1, like MED-V 2.0, is available as part of MDOP 2011 through the Microsoft volume licensing program, MSDN and TechNet.

Microsoft also said on Thursday that its planned Windows Thin PC – meant to turn an existing PC into a thin client – would be delivered as a Community Technology Preview (CTP) at the end of March. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.