Feeds

Oz governments find new use for censorship

Kill off naughty stuff? There’s an app for that…

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

Australia’s government has once again exhibited its enthusiasm for censorship, with the Minister for Home Affairs Brendan O'Connor reportedly considering setting the country’s content classifiers onto Apple's App Store and Google's Android Marketplace.

Apparently unaware that Apple works hard to sanitise its walled garden, O'Connor has told the Sydney Morning Herald that the government will require Apple and Google to remove apps from their stores if they would be "Refused Classification" in Australia.

Most recently, the "RC" tag has been applied to Warner's revival of gaming splatter-fest Mortal Kombat (Warners will ask for the classification to be reviewed).

The problem the government has invented identified is that apps distributed through channels like the App Store don't have to go through Classification Board processes before Apple will distribute them – unlike, for example, movies and computer games, which have to be submitted and classified before they’re offered for sale.

O'Connor foreshadowed requiring ratings to appear next to apps. While Google already does so, its ratings don't align with the ratings used in Australia.

However, rather than appoint most of Australia's adult population to the Classification Board to retrospectively review the apps that already exist, O'Connor told the Herald he will seek a change to legislation so that classifications would be undertaken only in response to complaints (this is analogous to how the Australian Communications and Media Authorities' list of "blacklisted" websites now operates). ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.