Feeds

Steve Jobs bends iPad price reality

Ordure on order

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

When he unveiled the iPad 2 last Wednesday, Steve Jobs hammered home the point that it was a bargain buy when compared to the competition. He was, at best, stretching the truth. At worst, he was shoveling bullshit.

"Some folks are out there saying, well, they're only a little bit more expensive than us at $799," Jobs told his San Francisco audience in a clear reference to the Motorola Xoom, which shipped late last month.

Standing in front of a slide that displayed the iPad 2's prices, Jobs continued: "When you take a look at this matrix of six models, five of these six models are less expensive than $799. So they've really moved up into high ground. We only have one model that's more expensive than $799."

Steve Jobs explains iPad 2 pricing

We resisted the temptation to Photoshop Steve Jobs with a growing nose, à la Pinocchio

Brett Arends of MarketWatch, in a price-comparison article this Tuesday, begs to differ. And he makes some rather incontrovertible points:

  • For $799, Motorola provides a Xoom with both Wi-Fi and 3G, and includes 32GB of storage space. A comparably equipped iPad goes for $729.
  • If you sign up with Verizon for that Xoom with a two-year contract, you'll pay $599. For a comparably equipped iPad from Verizon, you'll pay the full $729. From AT&T, it's currently $629, and that's for the now-discounted original model.
  • Should you want more storage space in your iPad than 32GB, you'd have to move up to the $829 64GB model – a $100 premium. Should you want to upgrade your Xoom's storage space, on the other hand, you could simply slip a 32GB card into its microSD slot – and that 32GB would set you back about $65.

"None of this, naturally, is to suggest the Xoom is inherently the better product or that you should buy one instead," writes Arends. "But it does counter the suggestion that the iPad is always the much cheaper alternative. It isn't. Despite what Jobs would have you believe, the picture is more mixed."

In his concise monograph On Bullshit, philosophy professor Harry Frankfurt of Princeton University writes: "However studiously and conscientiously the bullshitter proceeds, it remains true that he is ... trying to get away with something."

We'll leave it to you, Reg reader, to divine Jobs' intent, but when comparing pricing, we advise that it's always best to compare, shall we say, apples to apples. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Tim Cook: The classic iPod HAD to DIE, and this is WHY
Apple, er, couldn’t get the parts for HDD models
Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.