Feeds

Ofcom network census starts next month

Expect good connectivity until May

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Network reliability will be under the microscope from 23 March to 23 May, with even minor outages forming part of Ofcom's upcoming report on the state of connectivity in the UK.

That's one of the conclusions (PDF/124KB) reached following Ofcom's consultation on metrics needed for the first of its three yearly reports on the state of the UK network.

The consultation was launched in July last year, and received 22 responses from the industry about what should go into the report. Ofcom will deliver the first report to the coalition government by 7 August, it is likely to be published some time after that.

That report will include the availability of wireless and wired coverage, down to postcode level (or 100m2 for mobile phone coverage). It will also cover the reliability of the coverage as well as its speed, both locally and nationally, and how congested the back haul is.

Ofcom will also look at who can receive digital TV and radio services.

Ofcom had proposed detailed measuring of network performance between April and June, but the networks argued that they needed a month or two to put the figures together, so now the period under the microscope will start before the end of this month. During that period, every outage will be recorded.

There's still some debate as to what constitutes an "outage", but Ofcom intends to gather as much detail as possible. The bigger network issues will be recorded regardless of when they happen, but that two-month period will be the benchmark.

The data will only be gathered on the more-popular networks, and those available to the public. Wi-Fi hotspots won't be included this time, though they could be in 2014, while Ofcom has decided that private networks such as Airwave are outside of the scope of the report.

Deciding that scope has been complicated by the government's inability to say why it wants the data, or what it plans to do with it. Several of the 22 respondents suggested that Ofcom should do a minimalist job this year, and then use the response to that to decide how much effort to put in next time.®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
BT claims almost-gigabit connections over COPPER WIRE
Just need to bring the fibre box within 19m ...
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.