Feeds

Crime UK site gets 400m hits, drives down property values

Just how antisocial are hoax calls?

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

The UK's crime map has received over 400 million hits as worried citizens desperately try to get a grip on the level of hoax calls.

Tory MP Richard Graham fired a pile of questions at the Home Office last week, asking among other things whether hoax calls were recorded as antisocial behaviour.

Other questions included what plans the government has to "refine" the data, how frequently it would be updated, and how "accurate the figures were".

Graham also directed a question at Theresa May, asking "what account her Department took of the effect on (a) local residents, (b) house prices, (c) levels of awareness of crime and (d) levels of community cohesion of the publication of online crime maps; and if she will make a statement".

Home Office minister James Brokenshire confirmed that hoax calls to emergency services indeed show up as antisocial behaviour on the maps.

This goes some way to explaining why otherwise quiet streets can appear as crime-ridden on the map, thanks to a paranoid curtain-twitcher or a bunch of bored kids and a nearby phone box.

Nimby-ists are understandably paranoid that this sort of figure-skewing can decimate their property values, making the likes of South Central Guildford look akin to South Central LA.

Those 400 million hits lauded by Brokenshire will no doubt include plenty of house-hunters, who are being inadvertently put off entire suburbs just because a bored teenager keeps calling the local nick to ask for PC BA Con.

However, Brokenshire skirted this issue, saying it was down to individual forces to ensure the accuracy of data on the site.

Incidentally, he said, the site cost £300,000 to develop. In government terms this is probably a drop in the ocean, but the figure has drawn questions from developers. One has suggested he was able to knock up a similar site in a question of hours. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.