Feeds

Half a million Germans rally in support of 'Baron von Googleberg'

Big Facebook love for plagiarist aristocrat

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

A huge online campaign has rallied in support of former German defence minister Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg, who resigned on Tuesday after being stripped of his PhD for plagiarising large sections of his thesis.

At the time of writing, more than 545,000 people had endorsed the Facebook page "Wir wollen Guttenberg zurück" (we want Guttenberg back) and just 41,000 had cast their lot with counter-page "Wir wollen Guttenberg nicht zurück".

The 39-year-old Guttenberg, a wealthy Bavarian aristocrat*, stepped down from his post as defence minister after a firestorm of media and political criticism which saw him dubbed "minister of cut and paste" and "Baron zu Googleberg". His PhD in constitutional law had been formally revoked after he admitted copying large parts of his thesis, saying he had been driven to do so by the pressures of being an MP and raising kids at the same time as studying.

Prior to the PhD brouhaha, Guttenberg had become the most popular politician in Germany and had been seen as destined for great things. It would appear from the Facebook numbers that he still enjoys strong support from ordinary Germans: but at the moment the German media are solidly against him.

The disgraced toff also had outwardly firm backing from most of his fellow Christian Democrat politicoes, though this wasn't universal. Education minister Annette Schavan commented on his plagiarism: "intellectual theft is not a small thing. The protection of intellectual property is a higher good."

It appears, however, that ordinary Germans – or anyway those ordinary Germans who use Facebook – don't agree. The freetard aristocrat may well be back in politics sooner than had been expected. ®

Bootnote

*Guttenberg's full name and title is Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester, Freiherr [Baron, in English] von und zu Guttenberg. He inherited a castle in Bavaria and a mansion in Berlin, and the family wealth is such that he never had to work at anything but managing his investments before entering politics. He is married to another aristo, TV presenter Countess Stephanie von Bismarck (or Baroness von und zu Guttenberg, to use her title by marriage).

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!
Put it away boys. Cover them up ladies. Your credit cards, we mean
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'
US court hears of cached browser image - not actual request
Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD
'Officers were unable to determine Chicken's intent'
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Chomp that sausage: Brits just LOVE scoffing a Full Monty
Sales of traditional brekkie foods soar as hungry folk get their mitts greasy
Nuts to your poncey hipster coffees, I want a TESLA ELECTRO-CAFE
Examining the frothy disconnect in indie cafe culture
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?