Feeds

Microsoft and Google tag-team GeoTag patent

Demands satisfaction on 300 Maps cases

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Microsoft and Google have found a common cause. The two companies just joined forces to sue a tiny geo-location patent jihadist.

The giants have taken GeoTag to court, claiming that the company sued more than 300 outfits that use Bing Maps and Google Maps.

The pair want a US court to rule that the Bing and Google Maps customers did not infringe on a geo-location patent owned by GeoTag and that GeoTag must not launch additional suits. They are also seeking recovery of costs and fees.

GeoTag, according to Microsoft and Google, is accusing Bing and Google Maps customers of infringing on US patent 5,930,474 patent, which involves using mapping services to create store locators and similar locator services on websites.

The patent is called Internet Organizer for Accessing Geographically and Topically Based Information, and it's featured prominently on GeoTeg's home page here (warning: PDF).

Last year, GeoTag applied to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to be listed as a public company. GeoTag's website isn't exactly clear what the company does, but according to the Microsoft and Google legal filing, here, the company describes itself as:

Focused on licensing opportunities with companies whose web sites contain a geography-specific locator function (also known as a product locator, dealer locator or store locator). The companies whose websites utilize this function span a variety of industrial sectors.

Microsoft and Google launched their suit in US District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, Marshall Division. The US District Court for the Eastern District of Texas is traditionally friendly towards patent holders. In the Tyler Division, Redmond a lost patent infringement case brought against Microsoft Word brought by i4i. That case is now going to the US Supreme Court. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Yes, yes, Steve Jobs. Look what I'VE done for you lately – Tim Cook
New iPhone biz baron points to Apple's (his) greatest successes
Lords take revenge on REVENGE PORN publishers
Jilted Johns and Jennies with busy fingers face two years inside
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.