Feeds

Steve Jobs unveils iPad 2

Faster, slimmer, dual-core

Security for virtualized datacentres

Apple unveiled its second-generation iPad on Wednesday morning, called simply the iPad 2. Apple chief executive Steve Jobs, away from Apple on medical leave, did the honors, as was rumored yesterday.

According to live blogs from Macworld and ArsTechnica (for some reason, The Register is not invited to Apple press events), the iPad 2, Jobs said in a bit of an exaggeration, is an all-new design: "not tweaked." Some of that purportedly all-new goodness includes a new dual-core processor that Apple calls the A5 and up to nine-times faster graphics. The iPad 2 also has two video cameras, one in the front and one in the rear, as does the iPhone 4.

iPad 2

iPad 2 – also available in black

One truly striking thing about the iPad 2 – available in both black and white "from day one" said Jobs – is how thin it is. At 8.8mm, it's slimmer than even the iPhone 4, which is a comparatively chunky 9.3. Its weight, however, hasn't dropped all that much: from 1.5 pounds in the original to a still somewhat hefty 1.3 pounds.

As expected, the iPad 2 will support both GSM and CDMA, making it available in the US from both AT&T and Verizon – also "from day one." No mention was made of 4G connectivity, however.

Accessories include a $39 HDMI adapter to mirror video at up to 1080p, and a rather odd magnetically attached, polyurethane or leather cover – not case – that, as explained by Jobs: "Automatically wakes the iPad when you open it, and puts it to sleep when it closes it." The polyurethane case covers are $39, and the leather ones $69.

iPad 2 Smart Cover

The iPad 2's oddball innovative unusual Smart Cover can double as a tilt-up or stand-up prop

The iPad 2 will begin shipping on March 11 in the US, then on March 25 in 26 more countries, including the UK, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, and other big-market targets. Pricing will parallel that of the original iPad, starting at $499 for the 16GB, Wi-Fi–only version, and topping out at $829 for 64GB and Wi-Fi plus 3G.

In addition to the iPad unveiling, Jobs announced that Cupertino has (finally) struck a deal with Random House that will add more than 17,000 books to the iBookstore, bringing the number of publishers in the store to over 2,500.

In other number news, Jobs said that Apple has now paid more than $2bn to developers, the company's online app, music, video, film, and book stores now have 200 million credit-card accounts, they've sold "almost" 15 million iPads in 2011, generating $9.5bn, and have recently shipped the 100 millionth iPhone.

Steve Jobs, by the way, looked good. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Apple iPhone 6: Missing sapphire glass screen FAIL explained
They just cannae do it in time, says analyst
Slap my Imp up: Bullfrog's Dungeon Keeper
Monsters need to earn a living too
Oh noes, fanbois! iPhone 6 Plus shipments 'DELAYED' in the UK
Is EMBIGGENED Apple mobile REALLY that popular?
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
The Apple Watch and CROTCH RUBBING. How are they related?
Plus: 'NostrilTime' wristjob vid action
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.