Feeds

Woman sentenced for breaching former employer's PCs

Pants-ate-my-hard-drive defense fails

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

A California woman has been sentenced to 60 days home detention and a year of probation for breaching the mail system of a former employer and posting confidential company documents to public websites.

Ming Shao, who was 44 years old according to court documents filed last week, pleaded guilty to one count of felony computer intrusion. In a plea agreement, she admitted that the value of stolen information, which included a “Weekly Ops Report” distributed to executives of PanTerra Networks was from $10,000 to 30,000 to the Sunnyvale, California company. She said she retaliated against the company after being fired August 2009.

Shao had access to two employee email accounts for months following her dismissal. On several occasions, she posted confidential information to websites such as sacramentograpevine.com and hostedpbxproviders.com. The latter website, which covers user reviews and comments about PanTerra and other companies that provide private branch exchange services, published a posting by Shao that described a server crash.

Other information leaked by Shao concerned contracts in negotiation between PanTerra and potential customers. One company that was in negotiations for a contract valued at $30,000 to $50,000 dropped out after being outted.

During an FBI raid on her Cupertino home, Shao touched off a major confrontation with agents when she disappeared into a bathroom with a hard drive that was subject to a search warrant.

“Agents advised Shao that they knew she took the drive and that they would not be leaving until they found the drive and that she should turn it over,” a criminal complaint filed in July 2010 alleged. “After several minutes of silence, Shao reached into her pants and pulled the hard drive out.”

Shao was also ordered to pay a $2,000 fine and $20,747 in restitution. Prosecutors sought a sentence of probation because it was Shao's first offense and because she didn't benefit financially from the breach. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.