Feeds

Mac Trojan uses Windows backdoor code

Ha! Yeah! See? etc

Boost IT visibility and business value

Miscreants have adapted a Windows Trojan in an attempt to create malware that established a backdoor on Macs, as part of an apparent bid to drum up commercial interest for their dastardly wares.

MusMinim (dubbed BlackHole RAT by its nefarious author) is a variant of a strain of Windows Trojan called darkComet. Net security firm Sophos describes the malware as "very basic", while even its author characterises the malware as a work in progress.

The malware is capable of shutting down infected machines, running arbitrary shell commands, placing text on a desktop and otherwise messing with victims. However, its main function would appear to be the generation of fake "Administrator Password" pop-ups in an apparent attempt to trick users into handing over their login credentials.

The malware, apparently in development, displays a default message when reboot is initiated making it clear that systems are infected, Sophos reports.

"I am a Trojan Horse, so i have infected your Mac Computer. I know, most people think Macs can't be infected, but look, you ARE Infected!
I have full controll over your Computer and i can do everything I want, and you can do nothing to prevent it.
So, Im a very new Virus, under Development, so there will be much more functions when im finished."

The odd message seems to be targeted at potential buyers of the malware, we'd guess, since it makes no sense to advertise the presence of a backdoor on compromised machines to victims otherwise. Taunting marks went out of fashion in the VXer scene years ago around the time mischief was replaced by money making as the prime motive for malware creation.

Sophos, which has added detection for the malware, said that once fully developed the malware may be disguised as pirate software or games downloads and distributed through wares portal or torrent downloads. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?